Dental Tech Tag Archive

By |

How 3D Printing Is Revolutionizing the Dental Industry

Additive manufacturing is here to stay – is your practice on board?

3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, is that rare once-in-a-generation technological innovation that has the ability to transform global manufacturing industries and commerce in general as we know it.

To be honest, it kind of already is. In fact, according to the most recent Worldwide Semiannual 3D Printing Spending Guide from International Data Corporation (IDC), revenue in this amazing industry is projected to reach $28.9 billion by 2020.

Continue Reading

Read more »

By |

Understanding Dental Bone Particulate

When it comes to grafts in the US dental market, by far the most commonly used is human bone particulate from a tissue bank. I think it is safe to say that dentists generally know very little about the source and processing of graft materials. This article is intended to close that gap.

Continue Reading

Read more »

By |

What Dental Lasers and Early Cavity Detection Can Mean for Your Practice

As many of you may already know, the use of laser and light technology is vastly altering the medical and dental industries. Many dentists have discovered the number of benefits of incorporating laser technology into procedure implementations and treatments. Lasers have been noted to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of procedures and can diminish the amount of time necessary for treatment and recovery. Whether it is used for shaping a patients gums after periodontal disease or whitening teeth, as time passes the uses of dental lasers in cosmetic dentistry has become increasingly evident and popular.

One of the lesser known uses for a dental laser is the role this technology can play on tooth decay and carries detection. Until recently, detection of tooth decay has been difficult to detect in its earliest stages. Often evidence of decay can only be seen once it has progressed and begun to permeate through the surrounding tissue causing visible damage. The primary reason for this is that decay can move into microscopic tears in enamel where it can go unnoticed. In fact, decay cannot be seen until it is one-third the width of the tooth. This can give the bacteria a chance to do damage to the teeth and dental structure that could have been avoided if detected early. As decay progress it becomes more difficult to treat and can lead to a number of dental disorders. Until recently dentists needed to take x-rays and physically probe teeth to find evidence of decay. At this point the decay has already began doing damage to the enamel of the tooth. With the use of dental lasers however, cavity detection can begin much earlier.

Continue Reading

Read more »

patients like email

By |

Patients Like Email

Did you know?

58% of consumers start their online day by reading their emails.

76% of dental patients said email is the best way for companies to communicate with them.

This is based on a 2008 Sesame Communications research paper. Most likely today even more of your patients prefer e-mail.

So the question is… are you using it? Or even better are you gathering patient e-mail addresses in order to use it?

Here is an example of how e-mail communication can be used effectively with e-services.

First you have to collect and sore the e-mail address. Most Practice Management Systems have e-mail address as a field in the patient information field. Be sure you get it filled in. It has to be on your intake form, if you are still using the forms you had in 1995 you need to update.

practice-management-system_04

 

As all those existing patients who started with you last century and didn’t have an e-mail address need to provide it now. Make it part of your health history update. Ask for it and give the patient a good reason to provide it.

For example advise them that you will send e-appointment reminders rather than bother them with a phone call and most (76%) of patients will give it to you…but you have to ask. Another idea is to offer an incentive. For example: Dr. Digital has written a list of the five ways to save money on dental care. If you give us your e-mail we will send you a free copy.

Now that you have e-mail addresses how do you use them. The best way is with e-services. Again Most Practice Management Systems provides a good example of these services.

Appointment reminders are an obvious use for e-mail. However you can also use e-mail to direct patients to your web site to fill out forms. NOTE: Online forms are not just for new patients, this is a great way to make sure all existing patients have up to date personal and medical information on file. And better yet it is on file in a digital format so you can eliminate those pesky paper charts.

Read more »

By |

Technology Acquisition, Finance, and Training

tech-mistakes
Dentists are acquiring technology at unprecedented rates for a number of very good reasons.  Primary drivers are the rate advancement of technology itself, coupled with meaningful value that can be delivered relative to legacy technology. Larry Emmott makes the value of training crystal clear in his Ten Most Common Mistakes Dentists Make Using Technology.

I would like to add a few comments about how my practice chooses and finances new technology. Every year we establish a budget of somewhere in the neighborhood of $100,000+.  Our 4 doctors research the possibilities throughout the first 6 months of the year, paying close attention to which technologies will give us the biggest bang (= sales) for the buck, coupled with value to patient care.  With connected technologies we favor open source, to avoid the high cost of proprietary closed systems. For example we reviewed and had demos of digital scanning systems and milling units last year and chose 3M’s scanner coupled with Glidewell’s milling unit. For a huge discount off the cost of the “industry leader” we have been able to integrate wonderful same day crown technology.

In order to maintain strong financial control we always finance technology over 3 years – no matter what the cost. For instance Carestream offered an amazing deal to upgrade our CS9000 CT scanner to the CS9300 near year’s end. We chose to do that deal with financing at 2.49% payable over 3 years.

Considering how fast technology changes (especially computers and servers) having loans pay out every year in a 3 year cycle keeps us agile and allows us to change out or acquire new technology in a timely and affordable manner. If we can’t pay off technology in 3 years we don’t buy it.

And of course we do extensive training to avoid the mistakes on Larry’s list.

What are your thoughts on technology acquisition, training, and finance?

The Ten Most Common Mistakes Dentists Make Using Technology 

by Dr. Larry Emmott

  1. No training
  2. No follow up training
  3. Dentist doesn’t get training
  4. No training on updates
  5. Not enough training
  6. Lack of training
  7. Little training
  8. Self training
  9. Poor training
  10. Won’t pay for training

Read more »

× Close