dental software Tag Archive

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Cut through the “Noise”: connect with patients via text and email

What’s the likelihood that your dental text (SMS) or email reminders are getting the attention of your patients? How you answer could have much to do with your understanding about the digital “noise” competing for their attention.

Worse, that “noise” is also a potential cause for an increase in the percentage of appointment no-shows. This is especially true if you’re relying on SMS and email communication to prompt them.

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“Good” Charting Software

Good charting software has many features. One of the most important is that it eliminates all paper. That means the software must accommodate all the bits of paper data that accumulate in a chart and it must have a method of importing virtually anything either with a scanner or file import function. If some bit of paper possibly a lab slip or patient letter must be stored in a folder then you have lost one of the primary benefits of an electronic chart.

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The Future of Dentistry with Augmented and Virtual Reality

How VR and AR can and will affect clinical dentistry and the patient experience.

Dentistry is one of the world’s oldest medical professions, dating back as far as 7000 B.C. – so it’s no surprise that we’ve come quite a ways since then.

What many may not have seen coming, however, is how great of an impact emerging technologies such as augmented reality and virtual reality would have on the dental field. The effect is quite astounding.

Many dentists, like most people, find themselves a bit fuzzy when it comes to identifying the exact distinctions between augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR). After all, they’re both interactive,  visually-based technologies. However, they differ greatly when it comes to the user experience.

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Charts in the Cloud, who owns the data?

saved by the cloud... or not

When we buy a paper book or a DVD video what we are really doing is assuring access to that “content” whenever we want. If we want to read it or view it we just go to the shelf and get it. But if we can just go to the Internet and get it streamed to our e-reader we have the same benefit of ownership we just don’t actually have a physical book. But do you really own that e-book?

So how about a patient chart? We have charts stacked on shelves because we need assured access to that info whenever we need it. However if we could get the same chart info from the cloud anywhere any time wouldn’t that be just as good. In fact better as you could get the data at home or while traveling you don’t have to actually be at your office.

From a purely intellectual point of view cloud storage of digital content makes perfect sense it just seems strange and risky to us. Just as we are becoming comfortable with storing important information in the cloud another huge data breach is announced on the news. Then there is the other question. Who owns data in the cloud?

The vast majority of reported data breaches in healthcare (62%) are the result of lost or stolen computers. Not malicious hackers. That means that cloud based record storage is actually safer than storing the data on a computer in your closet. If the data is in the cloud there is no need to have the data stored on a local computer. If a burglar steals a computer out of the office that has no patient data on it there is no breach.

Data storage is just one aspect of cloud computing. What is even better but also even harder to accept is that the actual computing takes place in the cloud. We don’t have any software applications installed on our local computer we just exchange data with a big server in the sky and the actual processing of the data takes place in the cloud.

This idea was originally called ASP (Application Service Provider) and has been a wonderful but elusive geek dream for almost twenty years. Several dental management systems have been launched based on the ASP or cloud model and the early ones all failed. As have most of the general cloud based business applications. They failed for a variety of reasons including people’s distrust of the Internet and worries about the system failing.

With the new attitude, faster Internet access and just overall better systems cloud based dental systems are back. They are Curve Dental, Dentrix Ascend and PlanetDDS.

Originally published on Emmott on Technology.

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ShadeWave

shadewave

ShadeWave from digital dental camera expert Dennis Braunston is a cloud based software that determines tooth shades using a digital camera and a special shade tab.

A digital camera image is made of the patient’s tooth or the one that has been manufactured on the bench. In the image, next to the tooth is our scientifically formulated ShadeTarget placed near the tooth. The reference target has known mathematical formulas as do all of the shade tabs. These are called our Standards. The image is then uploaded into the ShadeWave program.

The user selects their image and clicks on Auto Correct. This unleashes an automatic process that locates and determines, through the use of advanced algorithms, the formula of the reference target colors. The target formula is then compared and mathematically equalized to the Standard. This color corrects the entire image revealing all of the unknown shades, translucency and value.

via Features.

The number on reason for crown re-makes is color. Holding a tab up to the tooth to choose a shade is little better than using a paint chip to match your drapes. If you really want to match the color you take the drapes to Home Depot and they match the color with a high tech device. We can and should do the same in dentistry.

The ShadeWave system can be used by both dentists and labs. It is cloud based so it is accessible from anywhere anytime as long as you have an Internet connection and a digital camera.

Emmott on Technology

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