Dental management Tag Archive

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Dentist Stories: Business Training, Toxic Influences, and Silver Diamine Fluoride

Here is another dentist’s personal dental story – and what was learned along the way. This story was chosen from a sampling of Net32 dentists to provide us with some insight into their stories, professional and personal alike.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving?
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Dentist stories

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Dentist Stories: Immigrating to the US, Pedodontic Residency, Pregnancy, and Relationships.

Your personal dental story – what you learned along the way. 

We asked a sampling of Net32 customers to provide us with some insight into their stories.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving? 
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Dentist Stories: Hard Decisions, Learning from Mistakes, Finding Balance

Dentistry is often considered as both “art” and “science.”

But that’s not all…

There’s leadership, management, continuing education, technology, insurance headaches, changing practice models, etc. etc.

Makes you wonder how you’ll keep up… let alone achieve a wonderful level of practice success.

Whatever your situation is as a dentist right now, your personal dental story is unique in how you got there and what you learned along the way. 

We asked a sampling of Net32 customers to provide us with some insight into their stories.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving? 

We are starting with one dentist’s story for this issue, as follows.

Meet Dr. Michael Cooley, Fashion Isle Smiles, Newport Beach, California

Dr. Cooley believes that school is always in session with dentistry. Growth and learning opportunities exist on both the clinical side and practice leadership and management side.

What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?

“I learn from my mistakes. Each one is an opportunity for growth and improvement.”

What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?

“One of the hardest decisions I had to make was choosing between entering a specialty program in Advanced Prosthodontics or joining my father-in-law in a private practice. I chose to join the practice. My decision has given me the opportunity to work alongside and learn from a mentor with over 40 years of practicing dentistry. That experience combined with ongoing CE courses has made a difference.” 

What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving?

“Advances in technology help us become more advanced in our practice. Oral health research also plays a key role. New discoveries in dental medicine have the potential to completely change the way we think about our approach to helping our patients.”

What additional wisdom has guided your dental career?

“ Find balance in life. Enjoy activities outside of the ‘dental world.’”

Get acquainted with Dr. Cooley, his team, and his Newport Beach dental practice at FashionIsleSmiles.com.

Key Take-Aways from Dr. Cooley’s Dental Story

  • Reflect on your dental journey. What mistakes have you made? How did those missteps create new opportunity?
  • Recall a defining moment in your dental career. How did that decision create new opportunity? Who has mentored you along the way and how did they shape how you practice dentistry? 
  • Keep learning and innovating. What new technology are you planning to implement? How do you anticipate it improving your practice efficiencies and quality of patient care?
  • Maintain a healthy work-life balance. What “recharges” you during time off?

What’s Your Story?

Keep learning from colleagues and Net32’s Modern Practice blog.

#dentistry #businessofdentistry #dentalpracticesuccess #dentalleadership #dentalleader #dentalpracticemanagement

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Collecting Co-Pays and Deductibles

Are your front desk personnel trained to collect patient co-payments and deductibles at time of service? Do they know the amount of receivables due from each patient and their insurance company? If not, your practice could be losing a significant amount of income. Studies show that collecting payment from patients at the time of service maximizes your collection percentage and decreases collection costs. Taking steps now to collect every dollar earned will prevent your profits from slipping through the cracks. This article offers strategies to successfully collect payments at time of service and is geared towards helping your front desk staff achieve winning performance.

Attitude is Everything

A patient’s first impression of your practice is their front desk experience. Your staff should be greeting patients by name, while presenting a professional attitude and appearance. They should be polite, and possess strong customer service and communication skills. Front desk staff must feel comfortable asking for co-pays and deductibles and indicate that payment is expected at the time of service. Their attitude needs to be friendly, yet firm. The dentists in the practice need to be supportive of the collection policy and refer all discussions regarding financial matters to the appropriate personnel, rather than discussing with the patient. Your office should have a clear, written financial policy, which should specifically state when you expect payment. This will empower your front desk personnel and send a clear message to patients.

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Why go Paperless? What I have now works and doesn’t cost a thing.

Why go paperless?

Paper charts don’t just appear in the office for free. The paper folder and all the other papers cost about $2.50 each. If you have 2500 charts they cost you at least $6,250 to create and every time a new patient walks in it’s another two-fifty; cha-ching.

Other chart contents, like X-Rays and photographs can be even more costly. A set of bitewings with film, processing and mounts can be a dollar or two. A photo printed from the intraoral camera is $1.50 or more. It is reasonable to add at least another $2.00 to the cost of each chart for these contents adding another $5,000 to the cost.

Storing the records isn’t free either. A typical office with 2500 charts will need three or four full size lateral files to hold them all. Depending on how nice the files are they will cost about $4,000 and could be a lot more. They will take up office space costing another $550 per year. Plus all the “inactive” charts stashed away somewhere else?

So far our inexpensive paper files are costing us $15,800, but that’s not the total cost. There is the human effort to make the chart, type the label, arrange the contents, file new bits when they arrive in the mail, write the notes, pull the charts every day and then re-file them. And of course there is the daily ritual of the lost chart, which no one can find only to have it turn up days later either misfiled or hiding in a stack on the doctor’s desk. The human cost is at least $11,520 per year.

What we have is a paper chart system that is really quite expensive costing $15,800 to create and $11,520 per year to maintain for a total of $27,320.

Help with Going Paperless

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