business leadership Tag Archive

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Dentist Stories: Business Training, Toxic Influences, and Silver Diamine Fluoride

Here is another dentist’s personal dental story – and what was learned along the way. This story was chosen from a sampling of Net32 dentists to provide us with some insight into their stories, professional and personal alike.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving?
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Dentist stories

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Dentist Stories: Immigrating to the US, Pedodontic Residency, Pregnancy, and Relationships.

Your personal dental story – what you learned along the way. 

We asked a sampling of Net32 customers to provide us with some insight into their stories.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving? 
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Dentist Stories: Hard Decisions, Learning from Mistakes, Finding Balance

Dentistry is often considered as both “art” and “science.”

But that’s not all…

There’s leadership, management, continuing education, technology, insurance headaches, changing practice models, etc. etc.

Makes you wonder how you’ll keep up… let alone achieve a wonderful level of practice success.

Whatever your situation is as a dentist right now, your personal dental story is unique in how you got there and what you learned along the way. 

We asked a sampling of Net32 customers to provide us with some insight into their stories.

The following questions were designed to ignite dentists’ thinking:

  • What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?
  • What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?
  • What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving? 

We are starting with one dentist’s story for this issue, as follows.

Meet Dr. Michael Cooley, Fashion Isle Smiles, Newport Beach, California

Dr. Cooley believes that school is always in session with dentistry. Growth and learning opportunities exist on both the clinical side and practice leadership and management side.

What advice would you give your younger self? What do you wish more dentists knew getting into the industry?

“I learn from my mistakes. Each one is an opportunity for growth and improvement.”

What was one of the biggest challenges you overcame becoming a dentist? What did you learn?

“One of the hardest decisions I had to make was choosing between entering a specialty program in Advanced Prosthodontics or joining my father-in-law in a private practice. I chose to join the practice. My decision has given me the opportunity to work alongside and learn from a mentor with over 40 years of practicing dentistry. That experience combined with ongoing CE courses has made a difference.” 

What excites you most about the future of dentistry? Where do you see the industry evolving?

“Advances in technology help us become more advanced in our practice. Oral health research also plays a key role. New discoveries in dental medicine have the potential to completely change the way we think about our approach to helping our patients.”

What additional wisdom has guided your dental career?

“ Find balance in life. Enjoy activities outside of the ‘dental world.’”

Get acquainted with Dr. Cooley, his team, and his Newport Beach dental practice at FashionIsleSmiles.com.

Key Take-Aways from Dr. Cooley’s Dental Story

  • Reflect on your dental journey. What mistakes have you made? How did those missteps create new opportunity?
  • Recall a defining moment in your dental career. How did that decision create new opportunity? Who has mentored you along the way and how did they shape how you practice dentistry? 
  • Keep learning and innovating. What new technology are you planning to implement? How do you anticipate it improving your practice efficiencies and quality of patient care?
  • Maintain a healthy work-life balance. What “recharges” you during time off?

What’s Your Story?

Keep learning from colleagues and Net32’s Modern Practice blog.

#dentistry #businessofdentistry #dentalpracticesuccess #dentalleadership #dentalleader #dentalpracticemanagement

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This Tango Takes Three!

This tango takes 3!

This month’s article is an attempt to change the conversation with a non-performing employee from one of blame to one of collective responsibility. We are happy to point out that, in keeping with the provocative nature of these articles, there is probably plenty here with which you might take issue. We welcome your critical review.

We start with our definition of Stewardship, as offered by our friend Glenn Mangurian: the responsibility to protect, preserve and enhance assets that do not belong to you but have been temporarily entrusted to you.

As an employer and a manager, you have been entrusted with the human capital asset of your employees. You have a responsibility to protect, preserve and enhance that asset. You must leave behind a richer set of assets at the end of the year than what you inherited at the beginning of the year. We discussed this in recent articles on performance reviews (Employee Performance is not just about Results and Put an End to the Annual Performance Review).

In this article, we discuss the implications of this stewardship responsibility. When you hire an employee, you are making a commitment that you will grow this employee to be a richer person each year – not just financially richer, but richer in their craft, in their profession and as a human being. You, as an employer, are accepting this obligation, knowing everything you know about this employee you just hired. So, in a job interview with this potential employee, not only should you ask if the individual can perform the duties of that job, you must also ask if you have the skills to enrich the individual, if your company has the capacity to enrich the individual, and if the individual has the potential and willingness to be enriched. It takes the combined efforts of the employee, the manager and the company for the individual to be enriched. In other words, it takes three to tango.

Does every employee have to grow each year? What is wrong with Joe, the welder in the machine shop who just wants to be a welder? Joe is a darn good welder. That is what he wants to be, he doesn’t want to do anything else, and I want to keep him. Joe is happy. He gets a good paycheck. He has a good life. Joe has been with me for a decade and I want to keep him for a couple more until he retires. What is the problem with that approach? Why shouldn’t I just let Joe be?

Well, there are actually two problems: The first is an economics issue and the second is a philosophical issue. Your company is expected to grow and improve each year. Not only is your revenue expected to grow, but you are expected to generate at least as much profit per dollar of revenue in spite of your expenses growing with inflation. How do you do that? By doing what you used to do even better and more of it. This economic reality requires each individual in your company to do more and do it better each year. So, you can’t just let Joe be. Joe has to become a better welder each year, weld more per unit of time, weld it for a lower cost, etc. But, wait a minute. Is it possible to do that forever? Don’t you reach a point where Joe is performing at maximum capacity and it cannot be done any better? When you and your employees peak, your company peaks as well.

The second problem is philosophical. An attitude of “let Joe be” instills a level of complacency that will permeate the entire organization. If you let Joe be content with doing what he did last year, you have to let the entire company be content with what they did last year. Will that be acceptable to you? Your organization’s excellent performance this year must become the benchmark of mediocrity for tomorrow. So, as a company philosophy you must require each employee to grow each year.

Now for a bit of reconciliation. Growing each year does not mean that Joe has to become a supervisor. Each employee has to constantly grow in his or her craft and profession. Even better, each employee should constantly expand their skills, knowledge and interest into related disciplines – neighboring disciplines to their craft and profession, neighboring disciplines of interest to the employee, and neighboring disciplines of relevance to the company. This growth responsibility falls on all three parties: the employee, the manager and the company. Although, in this day and age, no company guarantees lifetime employment, collectively, the three parties should guarantee lifetime employability.

How well do most companies fare on this score? Most companies will philosophically accept this position at the point of hiring an employee, but they quickly back pedal within a few years. Let’s point out four typical scenarios that companies and employees face.

First, a non-controversial and positive scenario is the performing employee with a growth trajectory. This is the case of an individual that performs exceedingly well. The individual grows in their job, takes on new and expanding assignments, assumes greater responsibilities and is generally successful. The employee, the manager and the company all discharge their stewardship responsibility. Well, that was the easy scenario where the dance and the music make for a beautiful tango.

The second scenario, still positive but uncomfortably so, is the performing employee for whom the company cannot offer the needed growth opportunity. This employee performs very well. He or she grows in their job. The individual is critical to the company. The boss depends on this individual. After a few years, the employee needs new assignments or additional responsibilities in order to grow. But, in your small company, there are limited growth opportunities. You just don’t have that next position for this employee. They are ready for it, but you are not. What should you do? What is your stewardship responsibility? The company has a responsibility to act selflessly and work with such individuals to position them for their next career growth opportunity, which will likely happen elsewhere (see Small Companies Must Turnover Good People). The employee, the manager and the company are usually hesitant to face this situation. And, in that hesitancy, all three fail to be a steward. In this tango, the music stops but the dancing continues without the gusto.

The third scenario represents the performing employee whose personal growth does not keep up with the market and environmental growth. This is where many companies get stuck with a “used-to-be-performing” employee who hasn’t kept up with the fact that you don’t use a calculator anymore but have to make an Excel spreadsheet. As in the case of Joe, the welder, this is an employee whose consistent excellent performance many years ago has slowly but surely become below mediocre by today’s standards. Who is at fault? All three: the employee, the manager and the company have been complicit in allowing the employee not to grow. In this tango the manager and the company have moved on to the new song but the employee is still dancing to the old song.

Finally, the fourth scenario involves a non-performing employee. The company and the manager often ignore the non-performance as an act of kindness when, in fact, it is gross negligence of their stewardship responsibility. When you hired that individual, you accepted a stewardship obligation to grow that individual. You have two options: either to discharge that stewardship responsibility or absolve yourself of that obligation. You do not have the choice to ignore it. If you approach the conversation with the attitude, “I (the manager) am unable to find ways, and create an environment in which, you can grow as an individual,” then the conversation becomes less about blame or judgment and more about stewardship. Both the music and the dancing stops in this tango.

You, as a manager, have an obligation called stewardship and a privilege called management authority. The former requires you to care for your assets. The latter allows you to acquire and dispose of your assets. The more diligently you discharge your stewardship responsibility, the more impenitently you can exercise your management authority. But, remember, this tango takes three.

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The Price of a Collegial Atmosphere

collegial-atmosphere

In the U.S. we do not discuss politics at work. And if somebody expresses an opinionated position, we simply smile, nod and move on to the next topic. Why? Because politics polarizes people and we want to maintain a collegial atmosphere at work. I grew up in India and I have spent a fair amount of time in Europe and Asia. Political discussions are not considered to be as polarizing in those regions of the world; they are viewed simply as a healthy debate.

Does a collegial atmosphere require lack of disagreement?

In a collegial atmosphere, can people disagree, express their opinions with passion and conviction, and close the conversation agreeing to disagree? We tend to believe that discussions must end in agreement or some sort of resolution. This tendency results in inauthentic conclusions to discussions.

Diffuse speakers relax their convictions and specific speakers dig in their heels for an argument. (Read article: Are You Specific or Diffuse?) Do all disagreements have to be resolved one way or the other? Can people maintain healthy relationships knowing full well that they disagree on certain important matters?

Healthy relationships are not measured by the number of hugs, but rather by the number of fights that end in hugs.

It is the ending in hugs that is important, not the lack of fights. Healthy relationships should foster healthy debates. Lack of debates might well be an indicator to the relationship not being healthy.

In creating an intentional corporate culture, you might strive to create a collegial atmosphere. The shadow side of this strength is fear of conflict – where people are reluctant to express their opinion because it is not aligned with the opinion being otherwise aired.

Fear of conflict leads to the loud and obnoxious shouting out the quiet and thoughtful. It leads to the multitude of subordinate opinions deferring to the single opinion of the superior. It leads to the new and different ideas being overwhelmed by the status quo of tried and true practices. In a culture of collegial atmosphere, it is important that you empower, encourage and enable people to face conflict and have healthy debates.

How do you teach people to have a healthy debate?

We offer three common causes for debates to turn ugly, and from it, three ways you can turn debates healthy.

The first cause is Aristotle’s principle of the excluded middle. The belief that there is a right and wrong. Something is good or bad. It is either true or false. Either you are on my side or you are with the enemy. This polarization of thought causes debates to become personal. What is the solution? Try throwing in expressions like, “I believe…” The more you use the term “I believe,” the easier it is for the other person to receive your opinion. So, do you turn everything into a belief?

That naturally leads us to the next reason debates turn ugly – facts versus interpretations.

In a wonderful book called The Communications Catalyst, my good friends and colleagues Mickey Connelly and Richard Rianoshek explain how people co-mingle facts and interpretations. By separating facts (that can be observed and measured) from interpretations (that are your way of looking at the facts and drawing conclusions from them), they argue that you can have more “accurate” and more “authentic” conversations. Instead people pursue “sincere” conversations where, by co-mingling facts and interpretations, they pursue “their truth,” convinced that it is the truth. So separate facts and interpretations and preface your statements with those labels.

Finally, ignoring the old adage, people fail to seek to understand before they seek to be understood. In our opinion, the most important aspect of a healthy debate is the ability to understand and advocate the other person’s point of view. (See our January 2013 Food for Thought, Coaching through Advocacy.) Showing that you can argue the other point of view demonstrates mutual respect for the individual(s), concedes the existence of multiple points of views, acknowledges an appreciation of the strengths of the other side, and in the process, expresses a recognition that the parties at play are not good or bad, right or wrong, based on which position they hold. It leads to hugs at the end of fights.

Following the practice started last month, we will be holding a telecon on this topic.

On February 20, we will hold a complimentary webinar at 8 a.m. (PST) where we will discuss this article and the fear of conflict shadow side of a collegial, friendly work environment. We encourage you to sign up and attend; please visit our event registration page here for more details.

We welcome your comments and encourage you to explore the Food for Thought archive. We hope your business is doing well. We’re happy to chat about the content in this article or anything else with which you’d like assistance.

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