By |

Getting More Reviews

 I’ve heard over and over again how important reviews are to a practice. Then it hit me like a ton of bricks one day. I was visiting another city and was looking for a great place to eat. And of course it had to be a Thai restaurant. How did I decide where to go? I ‘googled’ it.

So it was right then and there that I decided to pay more attention to getting more reviews for the practice. At that time we had about 5 reviews on google. Now we have 87. It has been about 14 months or so.

get-reviews

Public profiles rating

There are literally hundreds of ways of doing this. I’ve tried fancy software systems, ipad kiosks, asking patients, etc. I just want to share with you what we are doing right now.

We Have A Pretty Basic Approach To Patient Reviews.

ASK. It’s pretty simple.

Usually I would say something simple like – “Mrs. Jones you’ve been a great patient in our practice. We are working on improving our overall Google ranking and helping others know more about our practice. Would you kindly take a moment of your time to leave an honest Google review on your experience at our practice. It would really mean a lot to me.”

It’s amazing what happens.

To make it easy for the patient simply hand them a business card with instructions on how to leave a review. Here’s what ours looks like:

DentalArts-Google-Review-Card

Dental Arts Google Review Card

Give it a try and see what happens. You’ll be shocked. Now hopefully you are treating your patients well so you get 5 star reviews!

Subliminal Requests.

The other way we encourage reviews is utilizing our Revenue Well software. Baked into every message is a ‘leave a review’ button. If the patient clicks that, they can easily leave a review of your office.

You can take these reviews and feature them on Facebook and of course ask the patient to submit them to Google, Yelp, etc.

Reviews are an important part of your business. In today’s world you can’t properly represent your practice without them – especially the ones on Google.

Get started today!

Originally posted on  3D-dentists.com

t-bone-podcast

T-Bone Speaks is a podcast dedicated to helping you achieve clinical, financial, and personal balance. You’ll love the entertaining demeanor and down to earth approach to dentistry.

Read more »

By |

Charts in the Cloud, who owns the data?

saved by the cloud... or not

When we buy a paper book or a DVD video what we are really doing is assuring access to that “content” whenever we want. If we want to read it or view it we just go to the shelf and get it. But if we can just go to the Internet and get it streamed to our e-reader we have the same benefit of ownership we just don’t actually have a physical book. But do you really own that e-book?

So how about a patient chart? We have charts stacked on shelves because we need assured access to that info whenever we need it. However if we could get the same chart info from the cloud anywhere any time wouldn’t that be just as good. In fact better as you could get the data at home or while traveling you don’t have to actually be at your office.

From a purely intellectual point of view cloud storage of digital content makes perfect sense it just seems strange and risky to us. Just as we are becoming comfortable with storing important information in the cloud another huge data breach is announced on the news. Then there is the other question. Who owns data in the cloud?

The vast majority of reported data breaches in healthcare (62%) are the result of lost or stolen computers. Not malicious hackers. That means that cloud based record storage is actually safer than storing the data on a computer in your closet. If the data is in the cloud there is no need to have the data stored on a local computer. If a burglar steals a computer out of the office that has no patient data on it there is no breach.

Data storage is just one aspect of cloud computing. What is even better but also even harder to accept is that the actual computing takes place in the cloud. We don’t have any software applications installed on our local computer we just exchange data with a big server in the sky and the actual processing of the data takes place in the cloud.

This idea was originally called ASP (Application Service Provider) and has been a wonderful but elusive geek dream for almost twenty years. Several dental management systems have been launched based on the ASP or cloud model and the early ones all failed. As have most of the general cloud based business applications. They failed for a variety of reasons including people’s distrust of the Internet and worries about the system failing.

With the new attitude, faster Internet access and just overall better systems cloud based dental systems are back. They are Curve Dental, Dentrix Ascend and PlanetDDS.

Originally published on Emmott on Technology.

Read more »

By |

Moving to the Right – Your Dental Journey

I got a day off today and I sat down and thought about how I’ve ‘reinvented’ myself many times over the past 15 years. Whether it’s as a dental educator or as a practicing dentist.These days when I speak it’s not so much about clinical techniques, but more about your journey. We go through 3 phases in dentistry – general dentistry, advanced dentistry, and emotional dentistry.

move-right-img1

Moving to the Right

Let me begin by saying there is nothing wrong in staying in the general dentistry phase. One can make a tremendous living and have great satisfaction there. But the truth is that way too many of us are stuck there and have desires and goals to be much more than that.

If you complain about your practice, dental insurance, your team members, your finances, your patients, your dentistry, etc – then you need to have a plan of action to advance yourself. You are begging for something different.

I call it ‘Moving to the Right’

Each of us are going to have a different definition of general dentistry, advanced dentistry, and emotional dentistry. It should constantly evolve as we grow. For example, I once considered a single dental implant emotional dentistry – I now consider it the overlap of general dentistry and advanced dentistry (the lightning bolt).

So how do you move to the right?

  • You invest in leadership. Leadership is about how you communicate with patients, team members, and others around you. Leadership is about leading by example.
  • You invest in technology. Technology allows you greater diagnostic and presentation skills to help your patients say yes to the best.
  • You invest in a winning team. Without a great support team who are aligned in your vision (leadership) and great with technology, it will be very difficult to move to the right. Allow and encourage your team members to move to the right in their careers as well.
  • You commit to lifelong education. What services are you able to provide your patients? Are they the same services that you’ve had in your tool belt for the last several years? No wonder you aren’t growing and aren’t moving to the right to achieve greater satisfaction.
    So make today the day you commit to moving to the right.

What’s the first step?

  • Define what it would look like for you to love going to work everyday.
  • Define what it would look like to be happy in your personal life.
  • Define what it would look like to stop stressing about finances.

Until you define the target you can’t have something to shoot for.

This year I defined getting more time with my kids as taking a week off every 6 weeks and having a family vacation. We are achieving that.

I have defined professional satisfaction as working 3 days a week after dropping my kids to school in the morning. It is further defined by making 2017 the year that I no longer do fillings and single crowns.

I have defined stopping financial stress by having a concrete plan of action to create financial freedom by age 55. What is the number? What do I have to save/invest each month to achieve that number by age 55? Take that number and make it a monthly bill that gets paid automatically.

Dentistry can afford us so many unique opportunities. Take advantage. You are in control of your own destiny!

t-bone-podcast

T-Bone Speaks is a podcast dedicated to helping you achieve clinical, financial, and personal balance. You’ll love the entertaining demeanor and down to earth approach to dentistry.

Read more »

By |

New Healthcare Domains

domain-names

The new healthcare domains are significantly more expensive than the usual .com domains. Around $65 as opposed to $10 or less for most .com names.

HealthcareDomain-620x184

….. Check to see if your domain is available with our Domain Name Search tool.

Source: Domain Name Registration | Domain Name Search | NetworkSolutions.com

At this time people think just in terms of .com and usually an alternative domain like .net or .biz is not all that useful. However as we continue to grow and use the Internet more diverse domain names will be needed and eventually having a .dental will be valuable.

The graphic and link above is from NetworkSolutions. I looked for these same alternative domains, like .dental on Go Daddy and did not see them offered.

For $65 it could be a good investment, however I would not use it as my primary URL just yet.

Originally posted on Emmott on Technology

Read more »

By |

Don’t sell donuts

dont-sell-donuts

Let me describe a company and see if you can guess its name. I will quickly narrow your choices by revealing that this company is what the industry calls a QSR (Quick Service Restaurants, aka a fast food place). This company has thousands of locations the world over. Customers walk up to the counter to order, they experience speedy service and either take their order to go or sit down in the restaurant. What company name comes to mind? I suspect you are thinking of McDonald’s, Burger King or some other burger place, or maybe even Subway or Chipotle. Chances are you did not think of Starbucks, even though the description above totally fits. Why is that? Because Starbucks doesn’t want you to think of them that way! They don’t view themselves as a QSR. Dunkin’ Donuts, Krispy Kreme and Tim Hortons think of themselves as a QSR, but Starbucks doesn’t. Why? Because they don’t sell donuts. More on that later.

Imagine I started a business serving people who hate to do grocery shopping, so I hire people to do the shopping and to deliver it to your home. Assuming you were interested in that service, you will probably pay me a meager amount over and above the cost of the groceries and my cost in employing people to do the work. In other words, my gross margin on that business would be paltry. Said differently, even though I might amass large revenues, passing the cost of the groceries through the revenue line, the quality of my revenue would be poor. If, in addition, my staff were to unpack the grocery bags and stock your pantry and refrigerator, you would receive more value. Further, if I were to install detectors in your pantry and refrigerator that automatically determined your supply needs, and if I gave you an app on your smartphone with your needs all filled in for you to edit, you would appreciate that value even more. With each of these additional features, I improve my quality of revenue. The quality of your revenue – best measured by the gross margin you command – is a measure of your customers’ perception of the value you provide compared to their alternatives. How good is the quality of your revenue? How can you improve the quality?

Value is created by the use of capital and the use of labor. For example, a manufacturing company uses capital to procure raw materials and uses labor to turn the raw materials into a finished product that somebody finds valuable. A warehousing company might use capital to procure a warehouse and forklifts and use labor to store and retrieve warehoused products. An accounting firm uses very little capital but has considerable use for talented labor to provide their services. During the industrial revolution, when source of capital was considerably restricted, value was created using both capital and labor. But, today, when reasonable amounts of capital is much more readily available, there is a commoditized minimal premium for value created through the use of capital. So, to create quality revenue you must create significant value through talented labor.

What the customer is willing to pay for your goods and services is a function of both the real and perceived value of your offering in comparison to the alternatives they have. For example, McDonald’s cost in providing a hamburger to a customer – including all the cost of the store, furnishings, labor, etc. – is about $1.50. Interestingly, that is about the same as the cost incurred by Starbucks in providing a customer with one of their craft coffees. Yet, McDonald’s seems to need to sell its hamburger for $2.50 while Starbucks charges almost $4.00 for its coffee. Starbucks enjoys a much higher quality of revenue than McDonald’s does.

Why is that? Because, Starbucks doesn’t sell donuts. And, if they ever do, they won’t be your ordinary glazed donut for 99 cents, intended to be bought by the dozen. Rather, they’d be craft donuts, to be devoured and savored, and sold for at least two dollars and change. Starbucks doesn’t sell coffee; they offer you a coffee experience. If that experience requires that they offer pastries, they will do so. But it is the experience that is important. McDonald’s sells you food. Starbucks offers you an experience. That brand positioning allows them to create higher quality revenue.

Having grown up in the high tech world, I have always been amazed how Dell, Cisco and Intel are all $50-60 billion dollar high tech companies, but with distinctly different quality of revenues. Dell, for the most part, neither designs nor manufactures their computers — they market and sell them. For that service, they enjoy 20% gross margin. In contrast, Cisco hires talented engineers who design advanced servers and routers, but farms out the manufacturing to Asia. They, too, market and sell their products. But, for that extra work of their talented engineers they enjoy 60% gross margin. Intel does it all – they design, manufacture, market and sell their products. It invests billions of dollars in manufacturing plants and employs people to run them in two and three shifts. For all that work, it enjoys 65% gross margin. Which of these companies enjoy high quality revenue? Clearly, both Cisco and Intel do. But Cisco seems to have figured out what creates quality in their revenue.

Quality of revenue is achieved by providing value that is unique, maintaining a perception of that value through a brand proposition that includes pricing. If you sell your products cheap, you might increase volume, but you will harm the quality of your revenue. It is a tradeoff. The same is true if you discount your products. I ran a number of electronic instrumentation businesses. These high tech instruments often sold for tens of thousands of dollars. Additionally, we would sell software that would analyze the data gathered by the instruments. The software packages would often sell for equal or higher value than the hardware, and customers would often ask for a discount. I had a simple policy: I would never discount the software; and if I felt obliged to discount the hardware, I would give some of the hardware away for free. Why is that? Nobody asks for another piece of hardware for free the next time because they know there is a real cost to manufacturing the hardware. However, they will be tempted to ask for more copies of software for free.

Quality of revenue is achieved by brand positioning (what customers think of you), product positioning (what customers think of your product) and price positioning (what customers think of your value). You must actively and intentionally manage all three. There is nothing wrong with a business like McDonald’s or Dell. If that is the nature of your business, you must be operationally excellent. However, if your business is like Starbucks or Cisco, and you want to maintain the quality of your revenues, make sure that you don’t get tempted to start selling donuts.

Originally published on ThinkShift.com

Read more »

× Close