<a href="http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?authToken=0fg_&authType=name&locale=en_US&id=33105187" rel="author">Dr. Larry Emmott </a>is one of the most entertaining speakers in dentistry and he is considered the leading dental high tech authority in the country. He has over thirty years of experience as a practicing general dentist in Phoenix, AZ. He will have you laughing while you are learning. Check out his site at <a href="http://emmottontechnology.com" rel="author">Emmott on Technology</a>

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New Healthcare Domains

domain-names

The new healthcare domains are significantly more expensive than the usual .com domains. Around $65 as opposed to $10 or less for most .com names.

HealthcareDomain-620x184

….. Check to see if your domain is available with our Domain Name Search tool.

Source: Domain Name Registration | Domain Name Search | NetworkSolutions.com

At this time people think just in terms of .com and usually an alternative domain like .net or .biz is not all that useful. However as we continue to grow and use the Internet more diverse domain names will be needed and eventually having a .dental will be valuable.

The graphic and link above is from NetworkSolutions. I looked for these same alternative domains, like .dental on Go Daddy and did not see them offered.

For $65 it could be a good investment, however I would not use it as my primary URL just yet.

Originally posted on Emmott on Technology

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Big Time Fines – HIPAA and the punitive fines that are being levied on medical and dental facilities

data-security

The ADA News reports that a North Carolina ortho clinic has agreed to pay $750,000 to the federal government to settle charges that the clinic potentially violated the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) in 2013 by giving patient information to a potential business partner without a Business Associate Agreement (BAA).The clinic was fined three quarters of a million dollars just because they failed to execute a business associate agreement with a company that was duplicating x-rays.

There is no indication that any patient data was compromised, no patients suffered identity theft or were harmed in any way. The clinic simply failed to do some paper work.

As frightening as that is, this is worse. A medical research group has agreed to a $3.9 million settlement after an investigation determined that a stolen laptop contained the electronic protected health information (EPHI) of approximately 13,000 patients.

NOTE: The data was not hacked. It was exposed when a laptop was stolen. There is no evidence presented that the data was used in a malicious fashion or that anyone was harmed by identity theft.

The fine amounts to $300 for each of the 13,000 records that were lost.

If you lost a laptop or a thumb-drive with your 3000 dental patient records on it then an equivalent fine would be $900,000. Your liability insurance will not cover this fine. Could you stay in business if you were required to pay almost a million dollars out of pocket?

You can protect yourself in three ways.

1. Ensure that all patient data stored anywhere is stored in an encrypted fashion.
2. Do not store patient data on a local computer but keep all PHI in the cloud.
3. Get adequate insurance. (see below)

PCIHIPAA
Most dental liability policies do not cover HIPAA violations or else have very low limits. My friends at PCIHIPAA provide insurance that can cover you if you do have a data breach.

A technology risk assessment is required in order for your office to be HIPAA Compliant. A great way to get started with PCIHIPAA is to take advantage of their free assessment. Find out about any potential risks, what you can do about them and get a quote on insurance to cover you just in case.

Free Assessment

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patients like email

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Patients Like Email

Did you know?

58% of consumers start their online day by reading their emails.

76% of dental patients said email is the best way for companies to communicate with them.

This is based on a 2008 Sesame Communications research paper. Most likely today even more of your patients prefer e-mail.

So the question is… are you using it? Or even better are you gathering patient e-mail addresses in order to use it?

Here is an example of how e-mail communication can be used effectively with e-services.

First you have to collect and sore the e-mail address. Most Practice Management Systems have e-mail address as a field in the patient information field. Be sure you get it filled in. It has to be on your intake form, if you are still using the forms you had in 1995 you need to update.

practice-management-system_04

 

As all those existing patients who started with you last century and didn’t have an e-mail address need to provide it now. Make it part of your health history update. Ask for it and give the patient a good reason to provide it.

For example advise them that you will send e-appointment reminders rather than bother them with a phone call and most (76%) of patients will give it to you…but you have to ask. Another idea is to offer an incentive. For example: Dr. Digital has written a list of the five ways to save money on dental care. If you give us your e-mail we will send you a free copy.

Now that you have e-mail addresses how do you use them. The best way is with e-services. Again Most Practice Management Systems provides a good example of these services.

Appointment reminders are an obvious use for e-mail. However you can also use e-mail to direct patients to your web site to fill out forms. NOTE: Online forms are not just for new patients, this is a great way to make sure all existing patients have up to date personal and medical information on file. And better yet it is on file in a digital format so you can eliminate those pesky paper charts.

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Guide to “Going Paperless”

book

2016 is the year to “Go Paperless”

Stop putting it off, going paperless can save you tens of thousands of dollars. Make it a New Year’s goal – paperless in 2016.

My comprehensive technology guide, “How to go paperless in the dental office” will answer the basic question…Why bother?  It then provides step by step help in setting up a paperless office, including the eight essentials that need to be in place before you get started, four ways to digitize stuff, and front deskless workflow. There is even a budget and financial analysis that shows how your current paper system is costing you over $40,000!

“How to go paperless in the dental office” will answer all your questions, provide a plan and show you how to save money… all delivered in a fun and easy to understand style.

Follow the link to order your copy today >

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DICOM

Dicom

DICOM stands for Digital Image Communication in Medicine. It is an international standard for digital radiography that covers everything from hospital CAT Scans to dental periapicals. It is the DICOM standard that assures the reliable transfer of images from one system to another.

The DICOM standard also calls for the transfer of essential data along with the image. This includes the patient name, the date the image was acquired, the tooth number, the orientation and more. By arranging these critical data elements in a standard format they can now be transferred along with the image in a reliable manner.

To understand the concept, relate it to our old photographic system. A radiograph is just the image. Data elements in the form of the patient’s name, the date and tooth numbers are attached to the image by writing them on a mount or an envelope that holds the x-ray. As long as the mount and the image stay together we know about the film. However sometimes they are separated. Virtually every dental office has found an orphaned x-ray stuck behind the file cabinet at some time. With the data elements removed, in other words with the mount missing there is no way to ever determine whose x-ray it is and when it was taken. DICOM standards are the equivalent of permanently attaching the x-ray mount, and all the data it contains, to a digital image.

DICOM enhances interoperability. That is the ability of users to use different manufacturer systems with each other. The opposite of interoperability is proprietary.

Manufacturers like proprietary systems. Consumers prefer interoperability. Experience has shown that vendors will attempt to maintain control unless consumers demand interoperability.

Interoperability protects the dentist’s investment. If your brand leaves the market or another much better option comes along you can replace components as needed with other brands. The addition of DICOM to a digital radiography system does not make it more complex to the user. All the DICOM functions are invisible to the user; it does not require any additional steps to use. In fact the number of steps will be reduced when transferring or importing images as the user will not have to type in any patient data.

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