<a href="http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?authToken=0fg_&authType=name&locale=en_US&id=33105187" rel="author">Dr. Larry Emmott </a>is one of the most entertaining speakers in dentistry and he is considered the leading dental high tech authority in the country. He has over thirty years of experience as a practicing general dentist in Phoenix, AZ. He will have you laughing while you are learning. Check out his site at <a href="http://emmottontechnology.com" rel="author">Emmott on Technology</a>

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“Good” Charting Software

Good charting software has many features. One of the most important is that it eliminates all paper. That means the software must accommodate all the bits of paper data that accumulate in a chart and it must have a method of importing virtually anything either with a scanner or file import function. If some bit of paper possibly a lab slip or patient letter must be stored in a folder then you have lost one of the primary benefits of an electronic chart.

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Digital workflow: faster, more accurate & less expensive

Workflow equals systems. We all have systems in our offices. Some systems were designed and refined, and others just happened by accident. A system is the process we use to accomplish a task in the office. For example; how do you create a new chart? How do you confirm appointments? How do you get charts from the file room to the treatment room?

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Practice Technologist

Times are changing fast and technology is the primary driver of change.

You will Lose Your job to Technology, Unless…

For years I skated around the worry that technology would take jobs away from dentists and dental staff. I can no longer make that claim. Your job in dentistry will go away or at least be severely limited by technology in the future. There is one sure fire way to ensure that you will still have a job in the high tech revolution. Become the

“Practice Technologist”.

If you believe your job is to poke teeth with an explorer and take impressions you are fast becoming out of date. If you believe your job is to understand and use digital diagnostics and digital impressions then you are ahead of the pack.

If you believe your job is to pull charts and answer phones your job is in jeopardy. If on the other hand you believe your job is to maintain paperless charts and set up an online system to answer questions and take payments then you are secure.

The person who believes that their job is to understand and use technology effectively, can easily add new systems to the mix and embraces change will become indispensable; They will be an MVP the most valuable person in the office.

Here are three simple examples:

Practice Staff Person Practice Technologist
Pulls charts every day, spends time hunting for the lost chart then puts them all back again at the end of the day. Knows the management software well enough to create and maintain completely paperless records.
Hands a clipboard to patients to fill out forms then re-enters all the information in the computer. Sets up and uses online forms that synch with the electronic records. No paper and no dual entry.
Spends considerable time every day phoning and mostly leaving messages with patients to confirm (remind) them of an upcoming appointment. Sets up and maintains an online e-service that sends daily reminders with no additional input from office staff.

It is vitally important that the dentist understand the technology available to the office. As the practice leader the dentist needs to know what is possible in order to create a vision and lead the team.


Three days of Adventure C.E. that will change your practice, your Team, and your life!
Technology on the Rocks – May 18-20, 2017

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Three things to keep in mind about your reputation

More wisdom from Seth Godin:

Three things to keep in mind about your reputation

  1. Your reputation has as much impact on your life as what you actually do.
  2. Early assumptions about you are sticky and are difficult to change.
  3. The single best way to maintain your reputation is to do things you’re proud of. Gaming goes only so far.

Source: Seth’s Blog: Three things to keep in mind about your reputation

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Charts in the Cloud, who owns the data?

saved by the cloud... or not

When we buy a paper book or a DVD video what we are really doing is assuring access to that “content” whenever we want. If we want to read it or view it we just go to the shelf and get it. But if we can just go to the Internet and get it streamed to our e-reader we have the same benefit of ownership we just don’t actually have a physical book. But do you really own that e-book?

So how about a patient chart? We have charts stacked on shelves because we need assured access to that info whenever we need it. However if we could get the same chart info from the cloud anywhere any time wouldn’t that be just as good. In fact better as you could get the data at home or while traveling you don’t have to actually be at your office.

From a purely intellectual point of view cloud storage of digital content makes perfect sense it just seems strange and risky to us. Just as we are becoming comfortable with storing important information in the cloud another huge data breach is announced on the news. Then there is the other question. Who owns data in the cloud?

The vast majority of reported data breaches in healthcare (62%) are the result of lost or stolen computers. Not malicious hackers. That means that cloud based record storage is actually safer than storing the data on a computer in your closet. If the data is in the cloud there is no need to have the data stored on a local computer. If a burglar steals a computer out of the office that has no patient data on it there is no breach.

Data storage is just one aspect of cloud computing. What is even better but also even harder to accept is that the actual computing takes place in the cloud. We don’t have any software applications installed on our local computer we just exchange data with a big server in the sky and the actual processing of the data takes place in the cloud.

This idea was originally called ASP (Application Service Provider) and has been a wonderful but elusive geek dream for almost twenty years. Several dental management systems have been launched based on the ASP or cloud model and the early ones all failed. As have most of the general cloud based business applications. They failed for a variety of reasons including people’s distrust of the Internet and worries about the system failing.

With the new attitude, faster Internet access and just overall better systems cloud based dental systems are back. They are Curve Dental, Dentrix Ascend and PlanetDDS.

Originally published on Emmott on Technology.

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